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Uncomfortably Dark Presents: Black History Month

Join us in celebrating Black Horror Authors all month long!

Now more than ever black history month needs to be recognized, honored and cherished, not only to celebrate the culture, the heritage and the victories of black and brown people everywhere but to also help others recognize the similarities between us. We are not that different from any other race. We have suffered, we have loved, we have fought to overcome adversity, and to protect our loved ones. We have a deep history that spans countries and continents but sadly, often here in America, our differences and our similarities are often dismissed, trivialized or ignored.

Today, I hope to take the conversation in a positive direction by showcasing some very special authors, some you may know, others you may not. Let’s start with poetry, another genre very near and dear to my heart. Langston Hughes is very well-known as a great African American poet, descendent of slaves and white slave owners but how many of you have heard of Phyllis Wheatley, both a slave and a great poetess, far beyond her time? 

Phyllis Wheatley was the first published African American author ever, and the first African American author of a published book of poetry. She was owned by the Wheatley family of Boston, who encouraged her writing talents. Her poetry volume, Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral was published on September 1, 1773.  She was one of my personal hero’s when I was growing up.

Maya Angelou is another African American poet, one of the greats of our modern times. Her first autobiography was titled “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” and was published in 1969. This volume tells of her life throughout childhood. She would go on to publish more than 10 volumes of essays, poetry and autobiographies. 

Toni Morrison is a Nobel Prize and Pulitzer Prize winning American novelist.  She is perhaps most well known for her novel, “Beloved” which is a horror novel, due to its haunting tale, along with “The Bluest Eye” and “Song of Solomon.” Another well-known black author is Zora Neale Hurston who wrote “Their Eyes Were Watching God”, along with more than 50 short stories, three other novels and various other plays and essays.  Alice Walker wrote “The Color Purple” which led to her winning a Pulitzer prize. The novel was later turned into a movie and a Broadway musical. (Forbes.com/02182012)

All great authors that you should be reading, but let’s move on to what we do best here at Uncomfortably Dark. Horror!  Yes, my friends, there are many out there and I will be interviewing some new black horror authors on the site every Saturday this month. In the meantime, check out the below list and consider adding some of their work to your own “to be read” pile. 

For instance, “Fledgling” by Octavia Butler is sure to give you more than a few chills as a young woman discovers that she is not what or who she seems. How about “The Good House” by Tananarive Due, which details a woman’s journey back to the family home looking for answers, only to find evil. “Wonderland” by Jennifer Hillier tells a chilling story about an amusement park near Seaside, that turns out to be anything but amusing.  Find these and more at the link below.  (morbidlybeautiful.com/06182020) 

 
 

Meet L. Marie Wood

Horror Author/Screenwriter

When did you first begin writing? 

I have been writing since I was about 5 years old (and that was a looonnnnggg time ago!).  And I have always written psychological horror.  The nuance and innuendo of the sub-genre always spoke to me, even when I didn’t have the words to describe it. 


What made you want to become a writer?

It is just something that I have always had in me.  I can’t not write.  I am always writing, even if I am not in front of a computer.  I am collecting information, people-watching, living life, and storing information for later use.  I write because that is who I am.


What does it mean to you, to be a black author, to be a role model for young authors of color, that are aspiring authors?

I think that authors of color need all the role models they can get.  It is important to have goals and aim high, see people doing the thing you want to do and understand that it can be done.  If my path, the trajectory my work has taken, makes me a role model, I am pleased with that because it means that someone now knows that it is possible to do what they want to do.  However, it is an unexpected result to be sure.  I don’t consider that when I am writing, but if that is the outcome, I am deeply honored.


What challenges, if any, have you faced as a black author?

I have not experienced many challenges in the genre because I am a black author - at least not that I am aware of.  There are not a lot of black horror authors with name recognition and there are even less female black horror authors that meet that criteria.  Distinguishing which has been the source of difficulty is impossible for me.  What I can say is that by persevering, writing quality material, staying active, and meeting people in and out of the genre, I have carved out an interesting career.

  

What one piece of advice would you give to other black/brown authors/ artists in the industry?

Keep writing.  Doing that means that you will get better.  Getting better affords you more opportunities.  Keep writing.


Do you only write horror stories or do you cross-over into other genre’s?

Psychological horror combines many genres naturally - thriller, suspense, mystery, and quiet horror.  Sometimes I add some of the other sub-genres as well (a little blood never hurt anybody!).  That makes my stories feel like cross-genre work sometimes and I love that.


What was your earliest experience with horror? Movie, book, a real-life moment or nightmare?

Ha - I don’t actually know!  I remember watching The Exorcist earlier than I should have (sorry mom!) but I also remember reading The Shining (and Cujo) early.  I don’t know which came first.  I can tell you that I wrote my first piece before either of them.


What is your favorite thing about being in the Horror industry?

The freedom to express myself the way I want to.  I write about the things I like to write about and people read it and don’t give me the side-eye for it.  LOL!  That’s not to say that I’ve never been given the side-eye for writing horror… I definitely have, and by people I didn’t expect.  But the genre, in and of itself, exists and that I am a part of it doesn’t throw people who enjoy it the way I do. 


Whom do you most admire in Black history/culture and why, living or dead?

My mother.  Single mother, educator, smart as whip, stylish, and funny.  If I can be just a little bit like her, I call that winning.


What do you aspire to leave behind as your legacy and what message would you want to tell the world as a black cultural leader?

I hope to leave a body of work that is smart, engaging, and entertaining as my legacy.  Maybe my work will inspire someone to find their writing voice and run with it.  I would tell people to follow their  hearts and do what it tells them.  Don’t let anyone tell them that they can’t.


Do you have projects in the works that you would like to mention?

Sure!  My novel, The Realm, a fast-paced  tale about the afterlife and sacrifice, was released in October of 2020 (and this is book 1 of the series.  Book 2 will be out in October 2021).  My novella, Telecommuting, a story about the effects of isolation, will be released in May 2021.  Finally, my novel, The Promise Keeper, an epic tale about a vampire with a secret, will be re-released in May of 2021.  I won the Golden Stake Award for this one and I am super excited to see it come back out with a brand-spanking-new cover.

L. Marie Wood Bio:

L. Marie Wood is an award-winning psychological horror author and screenwriter.  She won the Golden Stake Award for her novel The Promise Keeper.  Her screenplays have won Best Horror and Best Afrofuturism/Horror/Sci-Fi awards at several film festivals.  Wood’s short fiction has been published widely, most recently in  Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire and Bram Stoker Award Finalist anthology, Sycorax's Daughters.  Learn more about her at www.lmariewood.com or join the conversation at @LMarieWood1.

 
 
 

Meet Rowland Bercy

New Horror Author

When did you first begin writing?  

I published my first book Unbortion in October of 2018, so just a little over two years now.


What made you want to become a writer?

I imagine it started with my love of extreme horror / Splatterpunk stories.  I started reading the darker, more disturbing authors at an early age and fell in love with the genre.  In addition, as you can probably surmise I love horror movies.  Books/movies which have something tiny as the main protagonist; things that can get under your bed or sofa and really fuck you up creep me out more than any.  Books like "DarkFall" and "Spawn".   Movies like "Trilogy of Terror", "Don’t Be Afraid" of the "Dark or It’s Alive". 

I got the idea for a story involving a baby, more appropriately a fetus, in the back of my mind and one day I said to myself, since I’ve been reading/watching this genre of horror, I bet I could actually write it too.  So with this in mind, additionally fueled by a heartbreak I was going through at the time (which is another horror story in and of itself).  I decided to see if I could breathe life into the story that was stuck in my head for so very long.  About nine months later I gave birth to Unbortion. 


What does it mean to you, to be a black author, to be a role model for young authors of color that are aspiring authors?

Me a role model? The possibility of me being a role model to others hasn’t even occurred to me.  I’m still relatively new to the scene with only three novellas under my belt and though I have been told by others in the community that I am an inspiration, the reality of that being a possibility is still strange to me. 

If I can be an inspiration to young and up-coming authors of color, in any genre of writing I am honored to be so.  Who knows maybe some young black/brown new comer will read Unbortion, Payback is a Witch or Pre-Thanksgiving Stress Disorder and say to him/herself “Hey, I want to write sick and twisted shit too.”  I’d be happy to have helped him/her realize their true calling in life lol…


What challenges, if any, have you faced as a black author?

So far none, which I am aware of.  People have been nothing but supportive of me and my writing.  I have thankfully faced no obstacles pertaining to me as a black author.  With everything happening in the world, much of it stemming from racially motivated situations, no one is paying much attention to my black ass, lol… That's exactly how I’ll fly under the radar and when the dust settles there will be a new, amazingly unique and unexpected African American best-selling author topping the charts.   

  

What one piece of advice would you give to other black/brown authors/ artists in the industry?

Write what you know and what you love.  Well, maybe you don’t have to know all there is to know about a subject to successfully write a story about it.  Hell, I didn’t know much about abortion, witchcraft or even female anatomy, lol, until I did my fair share of research on the subject matter, but because I was writing about things that I found interesting or creepy, I was able to write entertaining and interesting stories about them.    


Do you only write horror stories or do you cross-over into other genre’s?

For now I have only written horror and not crossed over into any other genres.  Payback is a Witch does have aspects of fantasy, considering its subject matter so given that fact I could possibly see myself someday writing a fantasy novel.


What was your earliest experience with horror? Movie, book, a real-life moment or nightmare?

It would probably be me at my grandmother’s house.  The adults were watching some scary movie, for some reason I think it was "The Exorcist" and they wouldn’t let the kids watch it.  I kept sneaking in the room and hiding under the end table trying to watch it with them.  After that, which I remember more vividly, would be me, mom, dad and sister going to Peaches in New Orleans, and renting horror movies on VHS, yes, I’m that old, which was our Friday night ritual.  Those Friday nights that we all spent curled up in the living room watching movies were some of the best times of my life.


What is your favorite thing about being in the Horror industry?

Just the love and out pouring of support from all the wonderfully twisted, disturbing, dark members of the community.  Funny thing is the darkness of their stories is a stark contrast to just how amazing and kind everyone is.  I feel very fortunate to now be a part of a great group of talented authors/people.

  

Whom do you most admire in Black history/culture and why, living or dead?

Alive – Tyler Perry.  He is in my eyes a true American success story.  His struggle from poverty and growing up in an abusive environment to the person he has become today is truly inspiring.  Not only was he able to prevail against what some would conceive to be insurmountable obstacles, it doesn’t appear to have broken his spirit.  I don’t know the man, but from what I have seen he seems kind and caring and to still have those qualities after so much pain and suffering is nothing short of impressive.

Deceased – Mansa Musa – a 14th century West African ruler, the richest man of all time.  A black man was the richest person EVER!  What’s not to admire about that?    


What do you aspire to leave behind as your legacy and what message would you want to tell the world as a black cultural leader?

My legacy… Aside from leaving behind some amazingly crazy stories that will hopefully live into antiquity, I think I just want people to remember me for the compassion and empathy I have for others.  Though these are worthy traits, sometimes I feel it’s not enough.  So I think I’m still figuring out how to leave behind something truly substantial as my legacy.


My message… Firstly, the world is a madhouse that could have you riding cloud nine one minute and walking through the valley of the shadow of death the next, with this in mind try to be good and kind to others.  Nothing sums this up better for me then the poem “Desiderata”.

Secondly… Find something you love at an early age and nurture it.  Hold on to it and let it be the thing you love to do most in life then find a job in that area of interest.  “Find something you love to do and you’ll never have to work a day in your life.”    


Do you have projects in the works that you would like to mention?

I am currently working on a fourth story which has the potential to be super creepy and cringe-worthy, hell doing research on the subject makes me cringe every time I have to do an internet search on it.  I won’t say too much about it but just know that you, the person reading this interview right now, could be an unknowing, unwilling vessel for very entity I am writing about, right this very minute… mwa-ha-ha-ha…


Rowland's Bio:

I have recently acquired / been assigned a new nickname “eyeballs” which I love.  Thank you for that,  Candace and I was born in the hip and trendy city of New Orleans, LA and currently reside in boring ass Houston, TX.  Author of three extreme horror / Splatterpunk novellas, including Unbortion, which placed as a finalist in the 2019 International Book Awards and won the 2020 American Fiction Awards, which I am super proud of.  I am a medical assistant during the day which is annoying AF but truth be told I’m hella’ good at my stupid ass day job, lol… 


I want to see Unbortion made into a movie, as it would be one hell of a re-make or re-imagining of the cult classic 1974 movie, It’s Alive (Think It’s Alive, but done in the first trimester and with one hell of an unexpected and imaginative ending.)  I have sent a copy of my book and a message to Jordan Peele and am currently awaiting his response.  He needs to come on with it 'cause I’m tired of working for the man.

I have had both Unbortion and Payback is a Witch converted to enhanced audiobooks, complete with ambient background music and sound effect, both of which are available on Amazon and Audible.  They came out AMAZING!

My website is www.rowlandbercyjr.com

 

Meet Kai Leakes

Horror Author

When did you first begin writing?  

I began officially writing in the summer of 2005, but I had been a oral storyteller longar than that and began playing with writing shorts in High School


What made you want to become a writer?

I had always been a storyteller, meaning thinking of fantastical worlds as a child, then eventually crafting oral stories for me and my cousins to escape into. The drive for that came about because my cousins and myself didn’t have any (if very few) representation in the genres we loved reading. We had no Harry Potter, Twilight, Bridgerton, even Fear Street didn’t have any color. So, I began thinking of stories to fill those holes that weren’t inclusive of us as young Black girl pre-teens and teens. That carried on into adulthood.


What does it mean to you, to be a black author, to be a role model for young authors of color, that are aspiring authors?

Being a Black author to me is an honor, and I feel a natural transition into generational history in my DNA. Our ancestors held on to whatever stories they could when forcefully trafficked here. I am to continue that through trying to create new stories but also revitalize the stories of our ancestors that did survive.


What challenges, if any, have you faced as a black author?

As a Black author who is a hybrid author (I am published traditionally and indie) the challenges come within who supports you and who doesn’t. How visible you are as an author to fellow authors and readers and who don’t see you. As anyone in the writing world knows it’s a challenge trying to maneuver that delicate network, especially in attempting to be published and marketed by traditional publishing houses. Throw in being a Black author and a Black female at that, and it becomes harder, especially without literary connects or connections that last.


The next is pedantic scrutiny. As a Black author who writes speculative fiction that focuses on Horror, pararomance, and Dark fantasy, the lens of scrutiny feels more constraining, especially as a Black woman. My work is dissected and judged more. Where non-Black authors get away with mediocrity, grammatical errors, overextending plots, etc. I am not given that same grace. It’s problematic at best.


I’ve been judged for how a character’s dialect is heavy in AAVE (African American Vernacular English), slang, and cursing. However, there is a popular author who writes Dark fantasy/pararomance whose white characters throw around curse words and AAVE based slang with ease. All that’s missing is the usage of the n-word with them. Yet, it’s applauded and acceptable for many white authors, including her. That’s a censoring, challenge that I always have to deal with as a Black female author.


What one piece of advice would you give to other black/brown authors/ artists in the industry?

It’s simple, stay true to yourself in this industry. Learn from it, grow from it but also practice self-care while maneuvering in this field. Writing should be a passion, it’s art. So don’t burn out due to how others are able to make it work and succeed in this industry. This is still something I even have to remind myself of, because it can be stressful to be a writer.


Do you only write horror stories or do you cross-over into other genre’s?

I’m excited to answer this one, I’m a hybrid genre writer, that’s what I call myself. I’m a hodgepodge because I’m a book nerd first and foremost and lover of magical fantasy. So, though I’m mainly as speculative fiction writer of horror, dark fantasy, and romance, I’ve been told my works also fit in thrillers. I’m also a romance writer. I also write fantasy with a touch of darkness (I have a steamfunk novella and a cyberpunk short story).


What was your earliest experience with horror? Movie, book, a real-life moment or nightmare?

I’m an 80’s baby. If you’re familiar with that era it wasn’t the birth of horror but it was the growth of all types of horror. So, I was scarred early by Nightmare on Elm Street, Halloween, Night of the Living Dead remake (which only scared me because there was a cemetery close to my grandmother’s block). So all of those things hit me at once, but if I had to say what stuck with me even until now? I’ll be different here, it was three things, The Jacksons ‘Can you feel it’ video, The Wiz subway scene, then Freddy. Those shaped me greatly and you can see it come out in my horror stories.


What is your favorite thing about being in the Horror industry?

Since I’m new to this, my favorite thing outside of realizing that I was a horror writer is the response I get from some of my stories by readers. They are the ones that tell me that I’m writing horror. I laugh every time because I just assumed that I was writing from a dark place. Horror lets me write out my depression or anger, or feelings about the mess that’s happening n the world. That’s what I love about being in this industry, it’s the readers.


Whom do you most admire in Black history/culture and why, living or dead?

This is broad, I’ll focus this on Black history/culture in horror, my favorite author is the late griot L.A. Banks, and the living horror icon Tananarive Due. They gave me Black culture, and history in their works. They gave me representation of Black women being amazing or foolish trying to maneuver through the horror lens they were stuck it. I cried when I was introduced to their works and was able to speak to them both. They’ve been my foundation for how I wish to survive as a Black horror writer.


What do you aspire to leave behind as your legacy and what message would you want to tell the world as a black cultural leader?

I’ve never thought about this before so thank you for this question. My aspiration as a Black female writer is that I hope to leave behind work that other Black writers, Black women hold on to and feel a sense of pride about being represented in genres that haven’t until now truly did us justice or showed us. I hope my stories carry on in their memories.


Do you have projects in the works that you would like to mention?

I currently have a horror short that features Black vampires in Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire, ‘Di Conjuring Nectar of Di Blood’, it’s a fave by me. I also just released a contemporary romance novel “Love, Lies, & Pleasures: A Brothers of Kemet series.” That series is a first for me in writing a romance that has no magic/magical realism, fantasy, or dark fantasy in it. My next project I plan to do is horror based, as well as another Dark fantasy tale.

Kai's Bio:

Kai Leakes was an imaginative child. Writing didn't seem her path, but with the goal of sharing tales that entertain and add color to a gray literary world has become a part of her DNA. She resides in her hometown St. Louis, MO. Her passion for romance with a touch of darkness and vampires led to her popular series, ‘Sin Eaters’ Devotion Books and companion novella with additional stories. Kai was featured in the HWA award-nominated horror anthology, 'Sycorax's Daughters’, and sci-fi anthology, 'The City.' Hopelessly romantic, Kai has released, "Love, Trust & Pleasure, and Love, Lies, & Pleasure: A Brothers of Kemet Series.

So, with fantasy and romance always on her mind, watch out for the darkness and magic that always follows. Learn more at: www.kaileakes.com


  • Horror Writers Association Bram Stoker Award Nominated: Sycorax’s Daughers.

  • Horror Writers Association Readers Recommendation: Black Magic Women: Terrifying Tales by Scary Sisters. Slay: Stories of the Vampire Noire.

  • Other stories: Oni’s Tears- A Steamfunk Adventure, Rebel Guardians: Sin Eaters Chronicles Book #1, A Christmas Kind of Love/A Holiday Kind of Love: Sojourner Falls Tales (co-authored), Rococca Anthology.

 
 

Author Tonia Ransom

 

Meet Tonia Ransom

Author of Risen

When did you first begin writing?  

I wrote my first horror story for a class assignment in second grade. It was Michael Myers fan fiction, complete with knives and bloody corpses. My teacher called my mom. I thought it was because it scared her, which is definitely true, but not in the way I intended!


What made you want to become a writer?

Honestly, I’ve never not been a writer. I used to tell myself bedtime stories before bed. But what made me want to pursue writing as a career was my creative writing professor. She told me that I had what it would take to succeed in the writing world, and I haven’t looked back since.


What does it mean to you, to be a black author, to be a role model for young authors of color, that are aspiring authors?

Everything. I didn’t read a Black woman writer until I was an adult. I never considered I could have a career in writing. It’s an amazing thing that I can be that example for other young authors of color so they can visualize writing as a career path and get started much earlier than I did.


What challenges, if any, have you faced as a black author?

To be honest, I haven’t faced many, but it’s primarily because I’ve made my own way. I have 2 traditionally-published stories out in the world, but the rest I’ve done on my own through self-publishing or through my podcast. I never liked the idea of playing the publishing game and how slowly everything moved, so I opted out early. That said, I started my podcast NIGHTLIGHT specifically because Black authors were facing so many challenges getting their work published. Editors seemed to want an arbitrary amount of blackness in a story, rather than considering the story for its merit alone. My goal is to be a place where the challenges of being Black in publishing are removed.


What one piece of advice would you give to other black/brown authors/ artists in the industry?

Make your own path. The journey is different for us all, and your way won’t look like someone else’s way and that’s okay. Figure out what success looks like for you and find a way to make it happen. Be creative in how you pursue your goals and you will be unstoppable.


Do you only write horror stories or do you cross-over into other genres?

I only write horror. I once wrote a literary fiction story based on the death of Tamir Rice as my way of processing his death, but it’s just up on Medium hanging out. I’ve never tried to get it published. It was something I wrote to help me make sense of a non-sensical world, and I put it on Medium to help other mothers of Black boys cope with the reality that our sons have to grow up too soon.


What was your earliest experience with horror? Movie, book, a real-life moment or nightmare?

I grew up in a super conservative community, so I didn’t have access to many horror books. The first horror movie I saw was Candyman and I loved every minute of it, probably because I knew I was too young to be watching it! But that’s when the horror bug bit me.


What is your favorite thing about being in the Horror industry?

I love scaring people. When people message me to say they had to leave their light on to fall asleep, I feel superhuman. And horror people are the nicest people you’ll ever meet. The community is a wonderful one to be a part of and I’ve met so many friends through my love of horror.


Whom do you most admire in Black history/culture and why, living or dead?

Zora Neale Hurston, hands down. She was unapologetic and lived her truth fully. Her body of work is amazing in that she did so much to preserve aspects of Black American culture that were being lost to time.


What do you aspire to leave behind as your legacy and what message would you want to tell the world as a black cultural leader?

I hope that I’m remembered as someone who uplifted other Black creatives. I hope to also preserve aspects of Black American culture, particularly hoodoo. Of course, hoodoo is still practiced, but I hope that my creative work sheds a light on Black culture for future generations to reflect on and learn from. I’d love to tell the world that we should celebrate the unique aspects of our culture, be true to ourselves, and be unapologetic about loving ourselves.


Do you have projects in the works that you would like to mention?

I’m working on a new audio drama, which I’m also pitching as a TV series. It’s Lovecraft Country meets True Blood, and it’s a love letter to my ancestors. It’s got hoodoo, monsters, and unnatural disasters and I can’t wait to share it with the world.


Tonia's Bio:

Tonia Ransom is the creator and executive producer of NIGHTLIGHT, a horror podcast featuring creepy tales written by Black writers. Tonia has been scaring people since the second grade, when she wrote her first story based on Michael Myers. She’s pretty sure her teacher was concerned, but she thinks she turned out fine(ish). Tonia tells horror stories regularly on Twitter @missdefying, and her debut novella Risen was released early December 2020. She lives in Austin, Texas. You can find her online at toniaransom.com.

 
 

Author D.E. Grant

 

Meet D. E. Grant

Author of Cursed Plantation

When did you first begin writing?

I started writing in high school.  It began with poetry and then with what I learned was flash fiction.


What made you want to become a writer?

I wanted to become a writer because writing set my imagination free.  Growing up, I used to make up back stories about people, houses and cars I would come across.  Writing gives my imagination freedom and my characters a voice.


What does it mean to you, to be a black author, to be a role model for young authors of color, that are aspiring authors?

As a black author, I want to inspire other young authors of color to follow their dreams.  I believe everyone has a unique story to tell and there are many ears eager to hear it.  I hope to inspire and encourage other authors of color to pursue their literary aspirations and give life to their stories and voice to their characters.


What challenges, if any, have you faced as a black author?

As a black author in my genre, I face the challenge of being heard in the wider literary community.  Writing and publishing my story is a major accomplishment, for which I am eternally grateful.  However, getting enough of the right people to read and hear about my story presents its own unique challenges, which I face daily.

  

What one piece of advice would you give to other black/brown authors/ artists in the industry?

Simply, keep writing!  Continue to give into your literary muses and write.  In spite of those who may doubt you or your abilities, some can be from those closest to you, KEEP WRITING!!  You will be heard!


Do you only write horror stories or do you cross-over into other genre’s?

As of now, I am only writing horror stories, but I have also sci-fi and fantasy stories planned once I have completed my current trilogy.


What was your earliest experience with horror? Movie, book, a real-life moment or nightmare?

My first experience with horror was seeing The Exorcist.  As the time, that was the scariest movie I had ever seen.  That movie intrigued me and that interest extended into reading horror stories from my favorite authors, Stephen King and Dean Koontz.  My second experience centers around a nightmare I had about being chased across a football field by gruesome creatures from a deep, dark pit.


What is your favorite thing about being in the Horror industry?

My favorite thing about being in the Horror industry is that my imagination has no limits and knows no boundaries.  If it is dark, evil, gory, shocking or eerily disturbing, I do not have a filter in being able to write it.


Whom do you most admire in Black history/culture and why, living or dead?

My list of living and dead heroes span many avenues and eras in Black history and culture, from science to entertainment to humanitarianism.  However, two women in particular have recently risen to the top of my list.  They are Stacey Abrams and our Vice-President Kamala Harris because in our current atmosphere, they stand as heroes in their own right, showing grace under pressure, strength when needed and as exhibits proving we as a people, and Black women in particular, can rise to whatever aspired level. 


What do you aspire to leave behind as your legacy and what message would you want to tell the world as a black cultural leader?

I aspire my legacy to be one of overcoming hinderances and barriers, to not be complacent and always striving to be my best.  My message would be to not be affected by change but AFFECT the change in your life and your world.


Do you have projects in the works that you would like to mention?

Yes, the second installment of my DARK SUCCUBUS trilogy, the sequel to CURSED PLANTATION entitled CURSED LEGACY, is being prepared for publication.  I am currently writing CURSED BLOODLINE, my trilogy’s final installment.


D.E. Grant's Bio:

Born the fourth of six in Jersey City, N. J., I currently live in Orlando, Florida.  Several of my poems have been published online and this is my first effort into the horror genre.  I am on social media on FB under D. E. Grant, on Twitter @degrant2017 and IG @d.e.grant2017.

 
 

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